10 TO MIDNIGHT (1983)

It's for jacking off! Isn't it?!?

An outraged police detective (Charles Bronson) and his rookie partner (Andrew Stevens) skirt the law to catch a killer of women.

An outraged police detective (Charles Bronson) and his rookie partner (Andrew Stevens) skirt the law to catch a killer of women.

Director: J. Lee Thompson

Initial DVD release: February 4, 2003

Box office: 7.176 million USD (US)

Screenplay: J. Lee Thompson, William Roberts

1 Hour 43 Minutes


REVIEW BY JEREMIAH

10 to Midnight is by far, my absolute favorite Bronson flick. The perfect blend of grit, sleaze, shocking violence, and sheer audacity -- it tickled me in all the ways trash cinema should tickle me.

Bronson is calm and collected, coming into his role as Leo Kessler stoic and completely composed—he only seems like a hard ass on the surface (likely cause he's old and tired), but there are moments which expose the soft underbelly of a police dad that cares. Moments which help bring life to—and humanize—the zero-pulse detective.

So when there's flinch and disruption to his cool demeanor, when things really hit the fan, when he's pushed to the tipping point (mainly by Gene Davis), you can't help but—not only be shocked that he's actually alive—but root for the guy as well (wait till you get to the interrogation scene; it's the perfect example of this).

And speaking of Davis, you couldn't ask for a better person to do the tipping. Playing the maniacal dick-in-the-wind Warren Stacy (a serial killer inspired by real life murderer Robert Speck), his unpredictability and energy make him the perfect counterbalance to Kessler. Its all very tortoise and the hare stuff, except with guns, knives, and a masturbation pump.

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